From kids

Teachers Notice Vision Problems

In this video, 4 school teachers experience some common vision conditions which can affect a person’s ability to read and learn. Many of these conditions go undetected during school vision screenings; therefore, it’s important to remember that even if you do not need glasses – this does not mean perfect vision. If your child struggles in school, or you are struggling to do visual activities after a concussion, you may need a Visual Skills Assessment. We can treat these binocular vision dysfunctions with vision therapy.

Learn more at our Vision Therapy Info Night with Dr. Claudia Lee on September 28 at 6:30pm! The event will take place at Brooklin Vision Care (6 Roebuck St.)
Please contact Steph at (289) 240-6610 or reception@brooklinvision.ca to register for a spot.

Free Glasses for Kids in Junior Kindergarten

If your child was born in 2012, get him/her in for a comprehensive eye exam before the end of JK!
We have a wonderful Eye See Eye Learn program which allows us to provide JK students with glasses, if needed. 🤓 Thanks to our industry partners OGI and Nikon for their support! 😘

Call (905) 666-4848 to book. We welcome new patients! 🤗

The Relationship Between Visual Impairments and School Performance

Parents always ask me, “My child is struggling in school. Would vision therapy help?”
My answer is MAYBE – Yes is will help, if there is a vision problem. However, it is very often that vision is the missing puzzle piece that was never addressed!

 

Ontario Principals’ Council recently published this outstanding article by Sheri Ainslie, a school principal who has learned about the missing piece to the puzzle of children who struggle in school–the vital visual skills that mean vision is much more than 20/20! Read it here: Seeing The Big Picture

Friday Success Story

Letters in particular gave Laurian quite a challenge as she frequently wrote them backwards. A comprehensive vision exam revealed that Laurian was a good candidate for vision therapy to improve her visual tracking skills. This would help her keep better track of where her pencil was going and to better understand the shapes of letters and words.

At age 5, Laurian started writing lots of letters backwards. She needed help with her visual tracking skills and vision therapy was just the thing! Click here to read about her story

Protect Your Eyes From The Sun

Just like we need sunscreen to protect our skin from the sun’s harmful UV rays, sunglasses play an important role in protecting our eyes from the the damaging effects that UV rays can have on our eyes!

sun-fun

Check out this Sun Protection Tip Sheet from Doctors of Optometry Canada:

To help reduce UV radiation damage to your eyes, consider the following tips:

1) Be conscious of the daily UV index and the many sources of UV radiation, including direct sunlight and reflections from snow, water, sand and pavement.

2) Wear sun protection such as sunglasses, UV-blocking contact lenses and a wide-brimmed hat or baseball cap, when outdoors.

3) Never look directly into, or stare at, the sun.

4) Keep out of direct sunlight between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest.

5) Keep children younger than six months out of direct sunlight. Use a canopy or umbrella as a sun-shield when outdoors.

6) If you require prescription glasses, consider:

  • Variable tint or transitions lenses that darken when exposed to UV light
  • A separate pair of glasses with tinted lenses and UV400 protective coating for outdoor use
  • Contact lenses with UV protection in combination with non-prescription sunglasses (check out the selection of high-quality prescription and non-prescription sunglasses offered by your Doctor of Optometry)

7) If you do not require prescription glasses, choose over-the-counter sunglasses with:

  • A close-fitting, wrap around style frame
  • 100% UVA and UVB blocking lenses
  • Impact resistant lenses